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preface 



HE JUNIOR CLASS OF 1911 herewith presents to the school at large 
its edition of The Allerlei. Our aim has been to make this volume 
suggestive of our school life, especially its happy side. That it may 
be full of interest to one and all is the sincere wish of those who 
have sent it forth. 

We most heartily thank each one who has aided so generously in the 
preparation of this book. 




Guy M. Winslow 

With glad hearts, we dedicate this book to our Principal. His ideals 
are high, his mind strong and alert, his manner gentle and kind, his 
leadership inspiring. 

We pledge to him our faithful support, and through The Allerlei hope 
to make "Lasellites" everywhere his true allies. 




Honorary Member Class 1911 




Marjorib Winslow 
The youngest Lasell girl 







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Editor-in-Chief 
Helen Thirkield 

Associate Editors 

Amie Wessel 
Margabet Jones 

Business Manager 
Ruth Butterworth 



Assistant Business Manager 
Katherine Pellet 

Literary Editor 
Helen Sayre 

Social Editor 
Elizabeth Brandow 



Athletic 1 Editor 
Edna MacDonald 

Jester 

Marie Hibbing 

Artists 

Gladys Lawton 
Barbara Dennen 
Doris Powers 
Helen Ferry 



Advertising Agents 
Grace Harvey 
Kathleen Knight 
Edna Felch 



Subscription Agents 

Nina Dietz 
Edna Kauffman 
Vera Bradley 



THE ALLERLEI 



13 



litit of jfacultp 



GUY M. WINSLOW, Ph. D., Principal 

LILLIE R. POTTER, Preceptress 

LILLIAN M. PACKARD, A. B. 
Mathematics 

MARY P. WITHERBEE 

English 

JEANNE LE ROYER 
French 

DESDEMONA LOUISA HEINRICH, A. B. 
German 

MARGARET RAND, A. B. 

History, Philosophy, Economics 

FRANCES BENT DILLINGHAM, A. B. 

English Literature 

GRACE W. IRWIN 
Latin, Greek 

DR. HOWARD W. GODFREY, M. D. 

Physiology 

E. J. WINSLOW 

Physical Sciences 

SUSIE C. JOHNSON 
[Assistant in English 

MARY AUGUSTA MULLIKEN 
Drawing, Painting, History of Art, House Decoration 

MIRIAM N. LOOMIS 
Director of Household Economics, Cooking 

MILLICENT LAKE 

Assistant in Household Economics 

FRANCES K. DOLLEY 
Sewing, Dressmaking, Cooking 

LENA K. FRENCH 

Millinery 



ANNIE PAYSON CALL 
Nerve Training 

BLANCHE C. MARTIN 
Reading, Expression 

JOSEPH A. HILLS LOUISA I. PARKHURST 

Pianoforte 

ALICE R. HALL 

Assistant in Pianoforte 

PRISCILLA WHITE 

Voice Culture 

HELEN GOODRICH 
Associate in Voice Culture 

HENRY M. DUNHAM 

Organ, Harmony, Chorus Singing 

S. E. GOLDSTEIN 
Violin 

GEORGE W. BEMIS 
Guitar, Mandolin 

MARY L. NUTT 
Resident Nurse 

NELLIE M. WARNER 

Physical Training 

LOIS E. WILLIAMS 

Swimming 

LIEUT. CHARLES A. RANLETT 

Military Drill 

W. R. AMESBURY 

Bookkeeping, Penmanship 

ELIZABETH O. BENNETT 
Stenography 

ANGELINE C. BLAISDELL 

Treasurer 



14 



THE ALLERLEI 



Mentor Class 



OFFICERS 



Mildred Goodall 
Mildred Snyder . 
Martha Hazelet 
Marion Hale 
Julia Ter Ktjile 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Yell Master 



"Oh, you funny little woman!" 
"Pat." She didn't wait long 
to decide that Lasell is the right 
place. T She started in her fresh- 
man year and has since kept 
up with the class of 1910. 

Supe: Katherine Pellett. 




Amy F. Brannan, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 




"Neil says." "Fawncy now!' 
Sergeant-at-Arms, Senior 
Class, Glee Club. For some 
reason or other Lucy's room 
seems to have an over-supply of 
Exeter banners. She has in 
many ways the ability of the 
bee, and can squelch while you 
wait, 

Supe: May Martincourt. 



"Ollie." She spends the day 
very often in the library search- 
ing the various reference books 
and encyclopedias in order to 
improve her already learned 
mind. She was never heard to 
laugh out loud but seems to pre- 
fer chuckling. 

Supe: Ruth Butterworth. 




Lucy A. Aldrich, 
Flint, Mich. 



Olive F. Bates, 
Hanover, Mass. 



THE ALLERLEI 



15 




S I Eeva L. Berman, 
K.J[San|Antonio, Texas. 



"Skeeler." "Looky!" 

"Reve." President Dramatic 
Club, Canoe Club, Captain 
Company D. "Reve" is a 
good-natured old "scout" but 
she surely can argue. She has 
a sunny exterior, but often a 
storm rages within when the 
world at large is unconscious of 
it. "Make a passageway, girls," 
often resounds through the hall 
and every one is aware that 
"Reve" is on the way. 

Supe: Nina Dietz. 



"Makes me so ma-ad!" 

"Nell." Dramatic Club. 

Nell doesn't believe in coming 
to breakfast before grace is said. 
She electrifies her friends every 
mail time with a huge bunch of 
epistles from long-lost cousins. 

Supe: Gladys Lawton. 




Mattie Nell Carneal, 
Richmond, Va. 




'*& Julia JE.|Crafts, T 

|fijf^GREENVILLE,iME. V£ 



Julia is one of those people, 
few and far between, who wisely 
say little about themselves. She 
is a girl that Lasell is proud to 
claim. 

Supe: Marie Hibbing. 



"Something fiercy." 

"Jule." Dramatic Club. We 
advise you, "Jule," to learn to 
darn; Gladys will not be there 
to darn his socks, you know. 
Julia is strong for Geta Psi and 
for French. 

Supe: Katherine Ivelly. 




Julia De Witt, 

Newark, N. J. 



16 



THE ALLERLEI 




"Muggins." Canoe Club. 
Margherita likes to indulge in 
spicy expressions and is ex- 
tremely fond of other people's 
clothes. She has enjoyed very 
much her two vacations spent 
in New York, also her friend's 
cousin. 

Supe: Alma Dumn. 



"Oh, Cat!" 

"Milg." President Senior 
Class, President of Leaves, 
Canoe Club, Adjutant. She is 
always needed to bring the 
tumultuous throng to order. 
"Milg" we hope that your posi- 
tion in drill will enable you to 
understand your helpmate's 
words of command, v such as 
"Present arms!" "Fall in!" 

Supe: Amie Wessel. 




Margherita Dike, 
Chicago, 111. 



Mildred V. Goodall, 

Saneord, Me. 




"Gee Pete!" 
S t a g e Manager Dramatic 
Club, Captain Company A. 
Mary is entirely too dignified 
to acquire a nickname. It is a 
case with Mary that "She who 
knows and knows that she 
knows is a wise woman." 

Supe: Beth Brandon. 



"Pergy." Treasurer Senior 
Class, Glee Club. Marion's 
gentle voice is heard above the 
multitude at various times, but 
that same volume of voice might 
come in handy behind the foot- 
lights. Why not, Marion? 

Supe: Gladys Dudley. 




Mary A. Gallaher, 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 



Marion L. Hale, 
So. Glastonbury, Conn. 



THE ALLERLEI 



17 




"Morning, Lena!" 
"Murphy." Secretary Senior 
Class, Dramatic Club, Canoe 
Club. "Murph" is one of La- 
sell's most popular girls! Every 
one loves her, even Dick-a-Deen. 
She certainly will make a fine 
cha.perone next year. 

Supe: Marion Ordway. 



"Fussed to tears." 
"Judie." Glee Club. "Judie" 
is loved by all who know her, 
and is every one's friend. She 
is lots of fun, and although she 
appears to be a saintly creature 
she is up for anything. 

Supe: Helen Sayre. 




Martha R. Hazelet, 
"Williamsport, Pa. 



Julia B. Hamilton, 
Great Falls, Mont. 




"Gee Whiz!", 
Dramatic Club. Helen sure- 
ly carries out the old adage: 
"Appearances are often deceit- 
ful." The halo she wears in 
public is often laid aside. Her 
favorite study is English which 
occupies her time into the wee 
small hours of the morning. 

Supe: Doris Powers. 



"Ding it!" 
"Dot." She is the proud 

possessor of a "perfectly good"" 
brother in the army — also nu- 
merous cousins. "Dot" spends 
"much time in industriously 
searching periodicals for anti- 
fat adds. 

Supe: Helen Thirkield. 




Helen B. Hood, 
Palm Beach, Fla. 



Dorothy A. Jones, 
Jamestown, N. Y. 



18 



THE ALLERLEI 




"Where's Florence?" 
"In a minute." 
"Kelsey." Business Manager 
Dramatic Club. Ruth is very 
original and has an unlimited 
supply of schemes. She also 
has a peculiar fondness for room 
28; why? 

Supe: Georgia Boswell. 



"See!" 
Canoe Club, Dramatic Club, 
Captain Company C. In this 
case it is an instance of good 
things coming in small pack- 
ages. She believes in doing as 
"Charlie says," and when it 
comes to paying debts she is 
"Johnny on the spot." She fa- 
vors University of Michigan. 

Supe: Grace Harvey. 




Ruth M. Kelsey, 
Sterling, Colo. 



Mary S. Lumbard, 
Oak Park, III. 




"Your Granny." 

"Movsse," "Fiji," "Jimmy." 
Canoe Club, Studio Club. This 
young lady with "all of the nick- 
names loves noise, adores hub- 
bub, idolizes uproar. We wish 
you would kindly question 
"Jimmy" as to her reason for 
remaining for Christmas in 
Auburndale when she had nu- 
merous invitations from all over 
the globe. 

Supe: Edna MacDonald. 



"Honest? Really?" 

"Bright Eyes." Canoe Club. 
When Irma's soothing voice is 
heard every one sits up. She is 
lovable, charming, amiable, win- 
ning and admirable. Irma 
wishes she could have been a 
man so that she could enter the 
navy as a "Brother officer." 
"Has anybody here seen Kelly?" 
was written especially for Irma. 

Supe: Helen Lewars. 




Eleanor Ft. Laurens, 
Charleston, S. C. 



Irma Levi, 
Birmingham, Ala. 



THE ALLERLEI 



19 




"Don't you knoiu?" 
"Tot." Major, Canoe Club. 
"Tot" could not be mistaken for 
a New Englander. She never 
tires telling of her experiences 
with horses "out on the ranch." 
But somehow she seems to like 
Jamestown, N. Y. For further 
particulars apply to Helen Scott. 

Supe: Elise Taggaet. 



"EK?" "Oh Zeus!" 

"Pucky." Ella surely made 
a hit in the French play. Her 
ability as an "actor" can not be 
overestimated. "Pucky" has a 
special grievance against the 
hair net; why? Her particular 
hobby is cutting out yokes and 
sleeves. After Commencement 
she'll hang out her sign of 
"French Modiste." 

Supe: Marion Shinn. 




Ina M. McLean, 
Miles City, Mont. 



Ella A. Puchta, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 




"Han." Canoe Club. Han- 
nah is an all-around favorite 
and every one likes her. If you 
ever hear any one saying any- 
thing against Hannah, you'll 
know there's something wrong 
with the speaker. Lasell will 
surely be sorry to lose her. 

Supe: Marion Davis. 



"You're funny!" 
"Schneider." Vice-President 
Senior Class, President Glee 
Club, Studio Club. This much- 
traveled lady has a newly ar- 
rived brother who greatly ex- 
cited the interest of Lasell last 
fall. "Our dog Schneider" has 
a sunny southern disposition 
and is loved by all "right much:" 
Supe: Margaret Jones. 




Hannah E. Proctor, 
Millbury, Mass. 



E. Mildred Snyder, 
New Orleans, La. 



20 



THE A L L E RLE I 




"And I was so mad!" 

"Susie." This demure young 
lady spends most of her working 
hours resting. When she is not 
in "48" she is sure to be found 
at Wellesley. For information 
regarding sudden Princeton 
strikes apply to her. 

Supe: Marion Joslin. 



"Girls, please pay attention." 

"Turk." Secretary and Treas- 
urer Glee Club, Class Yell Mas- 
ter. And she can yell, especially 
at the girls in Glee Club who 
manage to mistake E for E flat. 
"Turk" has a great deal of mu- 
sical ability. She never uses 
slang. 

Supe: Edith Palmer. 




Susan Stryker, 
Duluth, Minn. 



Julia M. Ter Kuile, 

MONTVALE, N. J. 




"Cornerstone." Our head mis- 
sionary worker has such a mar- 
velous vocabulary and is such 
a straightforward disciple of 
Webster that she never tires 
her listeners with one "pet" 
expression. 

Supe: Alma Bendixen. 



"How weird!" 
"Jo." Dramatic Club, Glee 
Club. "Jo" has a very happy 
temperament which brings to her 
a new strike every hour. She 
is a typical college girl and is 
very influential among her fel- 
low students. 

Supe: Helen Frick. 




Cornelia Stone, 
Kankakee, III. 



Josephine L. Woodward, 
Brookline, Mass. 



22 



THE ALLERLEI 



Mentor History 



IN September of the year 1906 rumors of a coming war 
with a foreign nation were heard, so 1910 gathered 
recruits from all corners of the land at Fort Lasell, 
furnished them with arms, and drilled them inces- 
santly, so that when the time came they would be 
able to render their faithful service to the mother 
country. For a year nothing came out of these rumors, 
and peace was yet reigning. But in 1907 the great 
nation of '08, seeing what an enterprising nation '10 
was, and foreseeing its coming greatness, sought for 
an alliance with this nation. In order to do this a 
conference was held at Karandon and a treaty of peace 
drawn up between these two nations. The rest of 
this year passed by very pleasantly and uneventfully. 
At the commencement of the next year this nation, 
convinced of its great literary talents and abilities, 
decided it would revive the custom of bringing 
forth a book of notable events, which was always of 
great interest to the other nations. But now the na- 
tion of "Faculty," which had hitherto remained in 
the background, stepped forth and laid a restraining 
hand upon this most enthusiastic nation; but so con- 
vinced were they of their capabilities that they soon 



won their point by a compromise. Many dreary con- 
ditions were imposed, but these seemingly insurmount- 
able barriers were soon gotten rid of and towards 
the end of May these volumes appeared, bound in 
blue and gold, the colors of the nation. 

In the spring of the year 1909, one balmy evening 
there was great excitement in and about Fort Deer 
House. Nations '09 and '11, armed with pails of 
water, were guarding the Fort, for some 'Her having 
seen a perfectly innocent '10er strolling around in 
this vicinity had immediately started the rumor that 
the TO's were going to lay siege and burn up the Fort. 
In order to reassure them, the '10's paraded before 
the Fort unarmed and then quietly went into barracks. 

In the fall of the following year this nation of '10 
had greatly increased its population and also had 
annexed new territory, that of Pickard House, and 
another most important acquisition was that of Crows' 
Nest. On December 17 all dispersed and visited 
foreign nations until January 9, when all returned and 
now are working hard and looking forward to the time 
when they will be annexed to that great nation, the 
World. 



THE ALLERLEI 



23 



Mentor's; gobel 

O-o-e-la-dan, e-la-den, e-la-den, 
O-o-e-la-den, e-la-den 1910. 



Mentor i§>ong 

Tune— "Tulane" 



Through all the different years, 1910 has stood the test, 
And she needs no clarion praises to be ranked among 

the best; 
So instead of idly boasting of the glories she'll attain, 
Let us all unite in toasting our class of 1910. 
Now Seniors gathered here, unite in one great cheer, 
Rah! Rah! Rah! 



Hail ! Alma Mater, to you, O glorious Lasell, 
Faithful shall we be and true to you we love so well; 
And whene'er fleeting time drifts us all apart, 
May we e'er be united, each heart to heart, 
When rallied round the flag of 1910. 



Chorus 
Let us all sing out pride three rousing cheers again. 
Let us unfurl far and wide the flag of 1910; 
Let us rally and show to the world just who 
Are those who are wearing the gold and blue, 
The colors of our 1910. 



24 



TjH E A L r L E R L E I 




Officers (Junior) 



Marion Ordway 


. President 


Georgia Boswell 


. Treasurer 


Katherine Kelly 


Vice-President 


Gladys Lawton 


Sergeant-at-Arms 


Marion Joslin 


. Secretary 


Edna MacDonald . 


Yell Master 



THE ALLERLEI 



25 



Junior Cla*£ 

Motto — Aim for the Highest. 

Colors — Black and Gold. 

Flowex — Pink and White Sweet Pea. 



Honorary Member 
Francis E, Clark 



MEMBERS OF CLASS 



Alma Bendixen, Springfield, Minn. 
Charline Billington, Pueblo, Colo. 
Elizabeth Brandow, Albany, N. Y. 
Georgia Boswell, Coffeyville, Kans. 
Vera Bradley, Stonington, Conn. 
Ruth Butterworth, Marion, Ind. 
Marion Davis, Worcester, Mass. 
Barbara Dennen, Waltham, Mass. 
Nina Dietz, Lincoln, Neb. 

Gladys Dudley, Roxbury, Mass. 
Alma Dumn, Reading, Penn. 
Edna Felch, Natick, Mass. 
Helen Fe^rry, Pittsfield, Mass. 
Helen Frick, Milton, Penn. 
Grace Harvey, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Marie Hibbing, Duluth, Minn. 
Margaret Jones, Evanston, 111. 
Marion Joslin, St. Paul, Minn. 
Edna Kauffman, Reading, Penn. 
Kathleen Knight, Brockton, Mass. 
Katherine Kelly, Springfield, Ohio. 



Gladys Lawton, Sheffield, 111. 

Virginia Lee, Bayside, L. I., N. Y. 
Helen Lewars, So. Yarmouth,' Mass. 
Edna MacDonald, Guanajuato, Mexico. 
Caroline Marsh, Pueblo, Colo. 
May Martincourt, Butler, Penn. 
Frieda Mayer, Chicago, 111. 
Louise Mayer, Chicago, 111. 
Marion Ordway, Orleans, Vt. 
Edith Palmer, Waterville, Me. 
Jane Parsons, Troy, Penn. 

Katherine Pellet, Hamburg, N. J. 
Doris Powers, Portland, Me. 

Jeanette Ritter, Allentown, Penn. 
Mildred Renwick, Ben Avon, Penn. 
Marion Shinn, Atlantic City, N. J. 
Helen Sayre, Flushing, Mich. 
Fannie Thomas, Lansford, Penn. 

Helen Thirkield, Washington, D. C. 
Elise Taggart, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Amie Wessel, Chicago, 111. 



26 



THE ALLERLEI 




W$t €bolutton of tfte Junior Cte 



IN the dawn of the Twentieth Century, Father Cul- 
ture, since modern society was deteriorating in 
its tastes, decided to serve to the world, in his cus- 
tomary centennial banquet, a rare dessert, notable, 
memorable. Its preparation he entrusted to Dame 
Enlightenment, who at once set out to find suitable 
ingredients. 

Not, however, until the fall of 1907, did she discover 
in Auburndale, Massachusetts, the requisites for the 
concoction of the delicacy. Selecting ten choice and 
well-assorted rosebuds, combining all the qualities 



demanded by the appetizing dainty in question, she 
put them into her Concentration mixing-bowl and 
added to them five tablespoonfuls each of Ambition, 
Enterprise and Perseverance; quickly stirred these 
together with a Sophomore spoon, added a well-beaten 
Constitution, and set the whole a-simmering over a 
slow fire in the Lasell Range. Then began the cook- 
ing — a long, slow and exceedingly delicate process, 
in the course of which occurred an accident or two, 
which her skill kept from proving fatal to the dish; for 
instance, on the addition of a teaspoonful of Essence 



THE ALLERLEI 



27 



of Metaphor and Simile, the kettle immediately and 
resentfully boiled over, some of the mixture unfor- 
tunately spilling into the Preparatory saucepan which 
bubbled joyously and vociferously thereupon. 

When the mixture had simmered a year, taking it 
from the fire, she drained off all superfluous juice, lest 
the buds become over-soft, doubled the respective 
amounts of the condiments first added, quickened the 
fire with her Daring poker, put on more fuel, and set 
the saucepan back to cook further. Now the con- 
tents began to boil merrily, and for the first time 
showed promising signs. Fumes of Originality began 
to issue thence and mingle appetizingly with the 
Friendship odors which came steamingly from the 
Senior pudding, cooking beside it. Then there formed 
in the kettle a huge bubble of Dramatic talent, Avhich 
presently broke, liberating, with much comfortable 
hissing, a savory play. But strangely enough, when 
the fumes from this bubble came in contact with the 
Junior stew, on the other side of the range, the result 
was remarkable — the stew, boiling no more, settled 
down into a heavy hum of a simmer. 

The cooking progressed; the end of the second year 
drew nigh, and the cook must make further use of 
her exquisite art ere the dish would be worthy of Father 



Culture's table. Other spices were added, and a gen- 
erous quantity of sugar, several Senior "crushes," 
gave a "tang" to the whole. Then came the addition 
of five ounces of Ingenuity and a season of very rapid 
boiling. When almost done it received a generous 
cupful of Unity of Purpose, as a final flavoring (the 
purpose — nay, the achievement — of outwitting the 
Sophomores). Not in vain had Dame Enlightenment 
added to her exquisite dish Originality and Enterprise. 
Consternation reigned on the cook-stove one wintry 
night in January, and it has been rumored that one 
kettle actually boiled over in its efforts to discover 
just what happened at the Woodland Park Hotel. 
But far be it from the writer to divulge promiscuously 
such weighty secrets. 

The dessert was now complete. It was exhibited 
—still in the mould, however — at the Woodland Park 
Hotel, to the admiring Seniors, this splendid dessert, 
the Junior Class of Lasell. Was there ever another 
class its equal? It now remains only to take it from 
the mould, garnish it with cap and gown and serve 
it hot on the Class Day platter in June of 1911 — the 
consummation of the combined skill of Culture and 
Enlightenment, the finest, most toothsome dainty 
that old Lasell has ever known — its Juniors! 



28 



THE ALLERLEI 



Junior S>ong 



As strangers once we came together, 

To live here at old and dear Lasell. 
Now the ties can never sever, 

But will bind us firm and well. 
And if in time those ties should weaken, 

Since fate we never can foretell, 
'Twill e'er be our guide and beacon 

That we were Juniors at Lasell. 



School days are flying swiftly by us, 

They are gone e'er we know they are here. 
And so while we still have them nigh us, 

We'll rejoice for each joy and each tear. 
May the actions of our daily lives be blest, 

So that every one of us can spell 
Success, as we "Aim for the highest," 

While we are Juniors at Lasell. 



Class fell 

Chihee, chihee, chiha, 
Rickety, Rackety, Rah! Rah! 
Wang bang boom yite, 
Hulla baloo balee balite, 
Razzle dazzle Wallapakee, m 
Chizzle chazzle, skirum, skiree, 
Chihee, chihee, chiha, 1911, Rah! 



THE ALLERLEI 



29 



GCfje Junior ^roptjecp 



IN the year 1920 there was a reunion of the Junior 
Class of 1910 at Lasell. Dr. Winslow had pur- 
chased a fine new airship for the school, and as 
it came from the Pacific coast he kindly placed it at 
our disposal. 

As it happened, Marion Ordway was the first to 
be called for. Our former class president was teach- 
ing Household Economics in a large boarding school 
in California. Elise Taggart, who resided in the same 
city, had gained great fame by her clever child im- 
personations. From there we flew up to a ranch near 
Seattle. This was the summer home of Marie Hibbing, 
who was a partner in a big "Paving" concern out 
there. Then we had to hurry to meet an incoming 
steamer. Among the first to disembark was Helen 
Thirkield, who had been in Siberia trying to reform 
the criminals. She had become very much interested 
in her work there, but when asked why she left it, 
she said she could not possibly afford to miss the 
reunion of such an illustrious class. We were very 
much surprised to hear that Jane Parsons was the 
stewardess of that same liner. 

We then started on our journey across the continent, 
stopping at various towns both large and small to 



pick up the different girls. Near a little town in Col- 
orado we looked down and saw a bright sunbonnet 
flapping in the wind, and were curious to know who 
was feeding chickens on the pretty little farm. As 
we dipped lower we found it to be our classmate, 
Charline Billington. She insisted upon finishing the 
feeding of her chickens before she could go on. At 
Denver we found Caroline Marsh, now a prominent 
leader in the cause of Woman Suffrage. Georgia 
Boswell had grown so accustomed to hoarding money 
that it had now become a habit and we found her a 
regular second Hetty Green. It was with much 
difficulty that we persuaded Virginia Lee to dismiss 
her school a week early, in order to come East with 
us in the airship. From her we learned where Alma 
Bendixen, now the president of a large woman's club, 
was to be found, and that the large "Kauffman Pretzel 
Factories" belonged to none other than our friend 
Edna,- who insisted on overseeing all the work her- 
self. In Omaha we were greeted by Nina Dietz, who 
was at the head of a large decorating establishment. 
She had been separated from Gladys ever since they 
left school, but it seemed quite natural to see them 
together once more. Gladys had just ended a very 



30 



THE ALLERLEI 



successful season as a chorus girl in one of the popular 
musical comedies. Indeed she had been promised the 
leading part in the fall. Marion Shinn, still enjoying 
single blessedness, was very busy editing a dictionary 
in opposition to Webster. We were not surprised 
to note that more than half the dictionary consisted 
of a slang appendix. Amie Wessel, now a Methodist 
minister's wife, was loth to leave her flock of eight 
little ones and her sewing circle, but we finally suc- 
ceeded in persuading her to do so. We stopped at 
one little town to lay in some provisions from Edith 
Palmer's fruit stand. 

We were met in Chicago by Mildred Renwick, our 
lady journalist, who insisted upon a full account of 
the trip so far, for the Chicago American. We found 
several others of our girls here. Vera Bradley was a 
coach for all kinds of entertainments. Edna Felch 
was the head nurse in Dr. Katherine Pellet's large 
private hospital. Ruth Butterworth was the head 
bookkeeper in a large wholesale house. Alma Dumn 
never could get enough to eat while at Lasell, so she 
had set up a restaurant of her own where she could 
always satisfy her hunger. Kathleen Knight had a 
milliner's shop on Michigan Avenue and Gladys Law- 
ton was a cartoonist for one of the principal news- 
papers. We found Marion Davis surrounded with 
babies of all sizes. She was the head of Chicago's 



largest Day Nursery. As it was necessary to stay 
in Chicago over night, as many as possible stayed at 
a boarding house kept by Helen Lewars. The next 
morning as we were preparing to depart we saw a 
Salvation Army lassie standing on the street corner 
and upon looking more closely we were much sur- 
prised to recognize in her our old yell master, Edna 
MacDonald. She was able to help us find Frieda 
Mayer, who was telling fortunes in a Dime Museum, 
and Louise, who had gained quite a name by her 
splendid playing in various recitals. 

Again we started eastward, stopping now and then 
to pick up our remaining classmates. Marion Joslin 
was touring the country as a lecturer, her watchword 
being "Laugh and Grow Fat." We came across Helen 
Sayre going from house to house as a book agent, and 
Jeanette Ritter as the president of the "Society for 
the Suppression of All Unnecessary Noises." Mar- 
garet Jones was very busy persuading the old maids 
of our party to advertise in her "Matrimonial Bulletin," 
for she was now the president of a big matrimonial 
agency. 

When we arrived in Boston we met May Martin- 
court who had just come in from her flying trip across 
the continent. She was the French maid on the Twen- 
tieth Century Limited, and it did not seem to us that 
she had grown any since we saw her last. Beth 



THE ALLERLEI 



31 



Brandow, we found, had become the editor of the 
"Pretty Girl Papers" in the Ladies' Home Journal. 
Before coming out to Auburndale we went down to 
meet a steamer which was just landing. Grace Harvey, 
with the party of girls whom she had been chaperoning 
abroad, ran up to greet us and was quickly followed 
by Doris Powers, who had been studying art in Paris. 
In a few minutes Katherine Kelly came across the 
gangplank with her husband, who was a missionary 
in India. It was in Boston that we went to Grand 
Opera where we all felt proud of our giggling Fan, who 
had won many laurels as a star opera singer. 

By this time the airship was pretty well filled, so 



we flew out towards Auburndale and dear old Lasell. 
The first one to welcome us was the preceptress, Helen 
Frick, and close behind her was Barbara Dennen who 
was living in Auburndale, although she was the organ- 
ist in one of the large churches of Boston. We were 
shown over the fine new buildings by Marjorie Winslow, 
who was now a very bright and attractive child of ten. 
We were especially pleased to notice that the new 
gym was plenty large enough for drill, and that there 
was a separate building for the chemistry laboratory. 
Several of the former teachers remained, and in spite 
of the many changes we still felt very - much at 
home. 



32 



THE ALLERLEI 




(&iiittx& (^opfjomore) 



Miriam Flynn 
Mildred Hall 
Louise Miller 
Rachel Edwards 
Miriam Flynn 



. President 
Vice-President 
. Secretary 
. Treasurer 
Yell Master 



THEALLERLEI 33 



Htgt of H>opt)omore 

Agnes Adelsdorf Lillian Lane 

Ruth Bachelder Alice Levi 

Hazel Blass Irene Lo-benstein 

u -o Florence Loebs 

Hazel Bower 

_, _, Marion MacArthur 

Emily Butterworth tt ,.. 

Helen Mayer 
Rachel Edwards Annie Merrill 

Elsie Fies Louise Miller 

Miriam Flynn Clara Parrer 

Elsie Gulick Helen p LAgs 

Lorena Gulick Marjorie Risser - 

Mildred Hall Eleanor Ryan 

Amelia Hardy Pamelia Spargo 

Marion Harvey Mary Star Utter 

Laura HeitmeyEr Edith Waller 

Beatrice Hirschfield Winifred Whittlesey 



34 



THE ALLERLEI 



TOje Utetorp of tfje g>opf)omore Clas& 




LTHOUGH Sophomores from time immemorial 
have been laughed at and ridiculed because of 
their conceit, surely even the correct Juniors 
could not conduct themselves with more modesty or 
be less assuming than we, considering the many achieve- 
ments of which we might well be proud. It will be 
remembered that when we began our career it was as 
the first class of Preps that had ever organized, and 
as Freshmen we accomplished results never before 
credited to that class. Was it not we, as Freshmen, 
who first announced our class officers; who suggested 
to the Sophomores the feasibility of having class ban- 
ners by flaunting ours before their astonished eyes, 
and who outwitted the same Sophomores when they 
had planned to serenade, we having arrived upon the 
scene of action first? 

And now that we are Sophomores we have not fallen 
below our standard. You notice that we managed 
to serenade before the Juniors, and thus raised our 
record even a notch higher. It is always best to 



be "a little bit too soon than just a little bit too 
late!" 

It was a great pleasure for us to have our sisters, 
the Seniors, with us on our hay-ride, that event which 
so astonished the Juniors, who never thought us capa- 
ble of planning anything of the sort. 

We cannot express in words the love and esteem 
that we cherish for our sisters, but in being ever ready 
to do the slightest service for them, we have hoped 
to show at least a part of it. 

It would not do to dwell at length upon the past 
successes of the Sophomores, for we put those aside 
as only natural. We are formed in battle-line, facing 
the foe, and not until the victory is won, and as gradu- 
ates of our dear Alma Mater, we lay our laurels by, 
will one of us desert the ranks to which we have pledged 
our best, or one face, dismayed at the task before, 
look backward. 

Editorial Note. — Was this written before Febru- 
ary twenty-second? 



THEALLERLEI 35 



&bbtce to tfje ^opfjomores; 

J ust follow the examples of 1911! 
Use more discretion than you have in the past. 
Never tell all you know but be sure to know all you tell. 
I magine yourselves in our place. 
Own up! That's impossible. 

Remember the January night you tried to find out 
where the Juniors were going. 

C atch on to something, sometime. 

L ook up to next year's Seniors. 

Act dignified for a change! 

S hine up to 1911's standard! 

S ee what kind of Juniors you can make. 



36 



THE ALLERLEI 



Officers 



Clara Prince . 
Helene Hamilton 
Margaret Gregson 
Ruth Arend . 
Catherine Brooks 



. President 
Vice-President 
. Secretary 
. Treasurer 
Yell Master 



Ltsit of Jfregtmen 




Dorothy Aiken 
Ruth Arend 

Juliet Beach 

Catharine Brooks 
Dorothy Dobbins 
Dorothy Dorr 
May Gates 

Margaret Gregson 
Helene Hamilton 
Mabel Kniffin 
Marjorie Lees 

Elizabeth Linn 
Ruth Maurer 
May Meloon 

Clara Prince 

Dorothy Rogers 
Helen Scott 



THE ALLERLEI 



37 



Jfretffjman J|t3torp 



THE Freshman Class has been invited to insert her 
history in the Allerlie but she can hardly do that 
for she began her being less than six months ago 
and as yet her greatest efforts have only enabled her to 
take a few faltering steps. 

The class of 1913 came into existence in September, 
1909, and great was the excitement on that autumn 
evening when we held our first real class meeting under 
lock and key, in Mrs. Martin's room. There was, how- 
ever, no interference from our friends (?) the Soph- 
omores, as they evidently accepted it as being in the 
natural order of things. As class colors, royal purple 



and gold were chosen, for the best is none too good for 
a class which promises so brilliant a future. 

Though as yet we have accomplished but little, it 
must be remembered that our experience at the best 
has been but a short one and that: 

"Heaven is not reached at a single bound, 
But we build the ladder by which we rise 
From lowly earth to the vaulted skies, 
And we mount its summit round by round." 
Step by step we are climbing upward and with a 
"Princess" as our leader we cry, 

"Long live the class of 1913." 



38 



THE ALLERLEI 



Histt of ^Preparatory 




Geneveive Bettcher 
Dorothy Bragdon 
Grace Linsay 

Gladys Phelps 

Cornelia Robbins 

Mathilde Schoverling 
May Sundh 

Sophia Wendt 



THE ALLERLEI 



39 



ILitit of Specials! 




Grace Alexander 
Myrilla Annis 

hortense atwood 

Elizabeth Bailey 
Dorothy Beacom 

Elsie Bensinger 
Bess Burke Marion Briggs 

Barbara Clark Ruth Burckett 

■ Amelia Cobb 

Helen Corbin 
Lucy Cox 

Mabel Cressman 
Grace Douglass Annette Cunningham 

Laura Doughty Peggy De Wolf 

Hazel Drew 

Bernice Eldridge 



Marion Halstead 

Marguerite Harris 

Charlotte Harris 
Athena Henkel 

Edith Herrick 
Luella Krentler Grace Holman 

Margaret Lamade Elizabeth ( Jaggard 

Marguerite Milliken 
Tessa May 

Marie Mills 

Hannah Morris 
Veronica Nahigian Marguerite Murdock 

Florence Nelson Dolores De Murguiondo 

Marion Pierce 
Louise Porter 
Edna Rosasco 

Lucy Russell ■ 
Sarah Shuttleworth Helen Richards 

Josephine Siggins Helen Shepherd 

Priscilla Schweppe 
Helen Stephens 
Maude Smith 

Ethel St. Clair 
Gladys Stults Gertrude Stearns 

Margaret Thacher Clara Strain 

Florence Thompson 
Marguerite Vicary 
Marjorie Watkins 
Grace Warner 
Anna Wright 
Edith Eisenstaedt 
Ruth Farmer 

Frances Fitzpatrick 
Alice Fuller 



40 



THE ALLERLEI 



tCfje Mentor poofe H>f)elf 



Margherita Dike — "Wanted, a Chaperone." 
Ella PuchtA— "The Jewel." 
Julia Crafts — "The Sweet Girl Graduate." 
Marion Hale — "The Advantage of a Low Sweet 

Voice." 
Mary Lumbard — "My Soldier Lady." 
Julia Ter Kuile — "The Music Lover." 
Hannah Proctor — "Bad Little Hannah." 
MaRtha Hazelet — "Cook Book." 
Reva Berman— "The Girl of the Golden West." 
Tot McLean— "Stories of the Great West." 
Josephine Woodward — "Sense and Sensibility." 
Susan Stryker — "Dream of Fair Women." 
Mildred Goodall — "The Executor." 
Julia De Witt — "Growing Up." 
Mary Gallaher — "Webster's Unabridged Diction- 
ary." 
Eleanor Laurens — "Half a Rogue." 
Olive Bates — "New International Encyclopedia." 



Cornelia Stone — "Old-Fashioned Girl." 

Mildred Snyder — "Almost a Genius." 

Dorothy Jones — "How to Grow Fat in Two Weeks." 

Amy Brannan — "Lavender and Old Lace." 

Helen Hood — "Lady of the Decoration." 

Irma Levi— "The Black Dwarf." 

Ruth Kelsey — "Famous Woman of Florence." 

Nell Carneal — "Forty Minutes Late." 

Julia Hamilton — "The Lovely One." 

Lucy Aldrich — "The Little Minister." 

The Faculty — "Lords of High Decision." 

English Room — "Where Laborers are Few." (?) 

Exams.— "The Crisis." 

The Preps— "The Younger Set." 

The Sophomores— "The Smart Set." 

The Juniors ) 

The Freshmen i 

Pickard — "The House Beautiful." 

70— "The Danger Mark." 



'The Real Thing. 



THE ALLERLEI 



41 



®f)e &toafeening 



(Prize Story) 



THE big red mansion seemed unusually still and 
lonesome to Elizabeth, and no matter how hard 
she tried, she could not think of what would be 
interesting to do, — so, cuddling up on the window-seat, 
and flattening her nose against the glass, she gazed out 
upon the passers-by, and wondered where they were 
going in all the rain and mud. 

People did not call Elizabeth pretty; in fact her nurse 
had said that she was exceedingly plain and not the 
least bit like her beautiful mamma. But really she was 
far from plain, for the child's very soul shone out from 
the big, wistful, blue eyes, and a sweet, trustful ex- 
pression about the corners of her mouth made her en- 
tirely lovable. Her hair, parted in the middle, was 
drawn back smoothly from her forehead, and hung 
down her back in two heavy bronze-gold plaits. 

Elizabeth's mother had died when she was born, and 
her father had scarcely been seen to smile during the 
twelve long years that followed her death. The little 
daughter was brought up under the care of the house- 
keeper and her old nurse, and since she had never been 
allowed the companionship of other children, she was 
quaintly old-fashioned in her ways. Never having 



known a mother's love, the child did not now miss it, 
as she otherwise might, yet she was vaguely conscious 
of a certain emptiness in her life, of something missing; 
and although she had been taught to be patient, she 
often felt pitifully lonesome, and longed for love. 
Poor child! this had been denied her, for her father saw 
in her only an awkward, homely little girl with reel hair 
and sad eyes. She was unattractive, and he wasted no 
time with her. It was pitiful how timidly affectionate 
she was, doing her best to make the stern man smile 
or pay her a little attention. She had heard the serv- 
ants say that the master did not love little Miss Eliz- 
abeth because she was so plain and did not resemble 
her lovely mother. She could not believe this, for in 
all the story-books fathers always loved their little 
girls and did all they could to make them happy. 

This afternoon Elizabeth was particularly lonely, 
more so it seemed than ever before, and growing tired 
of watching the passers-by, she got up from her seat 
and wandered slowly through the empty halls. Pres- 
ently she came upon a picture well known to her, and 
here she stopped to look at it once more. It was the 
life-size portrait of a beautiful young woman in white 



42 



THE ALLERLEI 



satin. Her red-gold hair was dressed high upon her 
head, and the bluest of eyes smiled down into Eliza- 
beth's. To-day they seemed to be kinder, tenderer, 
than they had ever been before, and they cheered the 
child's lonely heart, so that she smiled as she drew 
close to the picture and kissed the dainty white fingers 
painted upon the canvas. Then she whispered, "Good- 
bye, Mamma! good-bye!" Then she went on. 

A short distance down the hall she paused before a 
seldom-opened door. It had been her mother's cham- 
ber, and Elizabeth had been within it only a very few 
times when the housekeeper had taken her there, and 
had stayed — oh; so short a time! Now something 
within her seemed to say, "Go in: Nurse is asleep, no 
one will know. What is the harm?" A moment of 
indecision, then she softly opened the door. 

The dainty room was as it had been — the dressing 
table with all its silver, the writing desk, and the 
bureau, exactly as the mistress had left them. Glanc- 
ing about,, the child's eye fell presently upon a huge 
oaken chest in a small room adjoining, and wondering 
what it contained, she went to it, raised the lid, and 
peered cautiously within. In the dim light she saw a 
mass of shining white satin, now become somewhat 
yellow because of the years it had lain there untouched. 
With the utmost care she lifted it out, and holding it 
up, smoothed out the folds caressingly. "Why," 



thought she, "this was the very dress Mamma has on 
in the picture in the hall ! What a treasure!" So en- 
raptured was she in admiring the beautiful flowers 
embroidered in gold upon the bodice that she wholly 
forgot that she was doing wrong, and only when she 
heard a step behind her did she remember that she was 
on forbidden ground. 

"Miss Elizabeth, what are you doing?" 

The child turned with frightened eyes toward her 
nurse, who, looking for her charge, had discovered 
the open door and had thus found her just as she was 
unfastening her dress. 

"Oh, Sarah," she said pleadingly, "won't you please 
let me put this on — just for a moment?" 

A rebuke had risen to the lips of the nursemaid, but 
the entreating look in the child's tearful eyes softened 
her heart. The housekeeper was away and the master 
not expected home that night; so what was the harm 
of letting the poor baby have a little pleasure? She 
should try on the dress if she liked. Then smiling 
kindly at Elizabeth's delight at being allowed to "dress 
up" in her mother's gown, she took off the plain little 
frock, slipped the shining satin over the small head, 
and fastened the old-fashioned waist. Another might 
have smiled at the childish shoulders and bare arms — 
for the dress was a ball-gown, cut low and with only 
mere suggestions of sleeves — but Elizabeth, viewing 



THE ALLERLEI 



43 



herself in the mirror, thought herself quite the little 
lady, though of a year long gone by. Sarah unbraided 
the thick tresses and coiled them high upon the proud 
little head, then stepped back to view the result of her 
work. As she did so, Elizabeth turned, and said smil- 
ing, "Now, how do I look?" 

The nurse impulsively ran to her, clasped her tight 
in her arms, and cried, "You look just like the young 
mistress! Oh, if your father could only see you 
now!" 

Unused to such bursts of affection, the little girl was 
rather startled at first, then with an unaccustomed ring 
of happiness in her voice said, "Do I really, truly, look 
like Mamma? Come, let's go down into the drawing- 
room where the big mirror is, and I will play that I am 
Mamma, and you may be my maid. Won't that be 
fun?" 

Without awaiting an answer, she daintily gathered 
up the folds of her over-long skirt, and walked sedately 
down the hall and thence down the broad staircase . 
into the brightly lighted hall below. There stood the 
old negro butler, whose eyes fairly popped out of his 
head as he gazed astonished at the little lady descend- 
ing the stairs. 

"Good Lawd hab mussy on a po' sinneh!" he gasped; 
"but if dat ain't de young Missus, den I don't be 
standin' heah!" 



Sarah bade him open the drawing-room doors, that 
Miss Elizabeth might go in and see herself in the big 
mirror, and old Henry did so, with as much pomp and 
ceremony as he had ever used in announcing the ar- 
rival of the most distinguished guests of the house. 
Elizabeth laughed in pure delight as she stepped in 
childish attempt at majesty over the threshold, and 
standing before the huge mirror at one end of the room, 
bowed to the radiant image before her. Then to and 
fro she went before its magic surface, glancing now in 
the great glass, now over her shoulder to see the sweep 
of the long, embroidered train. 

But such luxury was not to be enjoyed long; for, 
fearful lest the housekeeper return and find them here, 
Sarah very soon bade Elizabeth come upstairs and take 
off the gown, and reluctantly throwing a farewell kiss 
to the little lady in the mirror, the child followed her 
nurse, who preceded her up the stairs. Passing the 
library, however, Elizabeth stopped a moment to 
glance into the dimly lighted room, when what was her 
surprise to see there her father, seated in the big 
leather arm-chair before the fire, and gazing with un- 
seeing eyes into the flames. He looked so tired and 
sad that, although her first impulse was to flee, his 
little daughter was possessed by a strong desire to com- 
fort him, and advancing a step into the room, she said 
softly, "Good evening, Papa!" Her father raised his 



44 



THE ALLERLEI 



head from his hand, and glanced carelessly toward her. 
When the little vision in white met his eye, he rose 
suddenly with a start from his chair, then paused mo- 
tionless, leaning heavily upon the leather arms. On 
came the child, smiling, then stopped in fright as she 
saw his dazed look. 

"Alicia!" The name of his dead wife came in a gasp 
from his lips, and he held out his arms. Then he 
clasped the trembling little form to his breast in con- 
vulsive tenderness, whispering brokenly, "My darling! 
my darling!" 

Frightened at this unexplained action, yet pitying 
the trouble she could not understand, the child lifted a 
trembling little hand, and patted the face bending over 
her. "Papa! Papa! Don't feel so!" she said. "It's 
only Elizabeth. Papa! — dear papa!" 

"Elizabeth — Elizabeth," he repeated hesitatingly, as 
he began to realize that this was only a dream, that his 
adored young wife had not returned to him, as he had 
at first believed. Then he held the child out at arms' 
length where the light of the fire fell full upon her face, 



and said in a half whisper, "I thought you were your 
mother! It startled me." Why had he never noticed 
before, he wondered, how much the little one resembled 
her mother — the same hair! the very same ruddy 
gold! 

"I'm sorry," faltered the child. "I didn't mean to 
startle you. I won't do it again," and she involun- 
tarily shrank from him. The action, slight as it was, 
gave him keen pain. His child was afraid of him — her 
own father! With lightning rapidity, conscience ac- 
cused him. What love had he ever shown her? What 
had he ever done to inspire her confidence? Alas, 
little! But suddenly, unaccountably, the love of his 
little girl now filled his heart, and taking her into his 
arms he kissed the quivering lips. 

"It is all right, darling. Don't be frightened," he 
said, his eyes moist. Then he sat down before the fire 
still clasping her, lost in the wonder of her new happi- 
ness, in his arms. Elizabeth had found her father, and 
he had found his child. 

Miriam Flynn, '12. 



THE ALLERLEI 



45 



Hooking JBacfetoarb 



(Prize Poem) 



Once upon a stormy, dreary winter's day, when I was 
weary, 
Accidentally I found a volume of peculiar lore; 
It was a book wherein there dwell fond memories of old 
Lasell ! 
I opened it and bade it tell the records of my school- 
days, o'er: — 
Those school-days long since past and o'er. 



But soon, our pleasure to enhance, there came the New 
and Old girls' dance; 
'Twas there, by an unlucky chance, my simple party 
gown I tore. 
The evening passed in fun and glee — so clearly it comes 
back to me, 
When on this open page I see the list of names my 

program bore. 
Distinguished names my program bore! 



Ah, distinctly I recall that it was in the early fall; 
I had bidden each and all my friends farewell, my 
heart full sore. 
How my brain was whirling, reeling, with a sinking 
homesick feeling 
Suddenly o'er heart-strings stealing as I reached 

Lasell's front door! 
That Fearful, Gruesome, Big Front Door! 



And on another page — but hush ! dare I make mention 
of my "Crush"? 
How pulse would beat and cheek would flush when- 
e'er on me her eyes she'd lower — 
How if, perchance, she deigned to speak, I lived in bliss 
for full a week, 
And no companion cared to seek save her whom once 

I did adore! 
So short a time I did adore! 



46 



T H'E ALLERLE^I 



Then the gleeful midnight greeting, when most clandes- 
tinely meeting 
For the purpose sole of eating much, and most, and 
even more ; — 
And memories of next day's ills, ye remnant of that box 
of pills: 
The medicine that "cures or kills" which dear Miss 

Nutt did down us pour. 
Relentlessly did down us pour! 

That awful Student-Government which straightway 
study-hallward sent 
The many misjudged maids who meant a prompt re- 
turn sometime before 
Vacation ended; — but, delayed, for reasons good or bad 
they stayed, 
And three fat dollars duly paid, though angry to the 

very core — 
The very heart's and bosom's core! 



At last Commencement morning came, when Seniors 
grand, of widespread fame, 
Were sent out, each to make her name — would 
Father Time were only slower, 
For now my book comes to an end, I lay aside this 
faithful friend, 
Who backward flying wings doth lend that bear me 

to those days of yore— 
Those doubly happy days of yore! 

Oh, merry, gladsome, girlhood days, warmed by the joy- 
sun's loving rays, 
I turn to you my longing gaze as o'er these chron- 
icles I pore. 
It matters not how long I live, — emphatic and super- 
lative 
Shall be the grateful praise I'll give Lasell, forever- 
more! 
Yes, praise forevermore! 

Marion Briggs, Special. 



THE ALLERLEI 



47 



ikljool Spirit 



(Prize Essay) 



WE speak of "our school," not as of "our house," 
with a sense of possession; we name "our 
school," not as "our Church," an expression 
of cult or sect; we recall "our school," not as a memory 
of books and teachers, of work days and vacations, for 
it is ever "our school," "our Alma Mater," the inspira- 
tion of that which, in the citizen, is called patriotism, 
and, in the alumnus and scholar, school spirit. Our 
school is the common ground which nurtures many 
lasting friendships. It is the refiner's caldron into 
which go many elements that, freed from alloy, become 
the pure metal — the loyal student body. 

This spirit will not be analyzed, it will not be de- 
scribed, but look where you will, you find it. It is the 
feeling of the alienist for his country, the soldier for his 
flag, the child for his parent, and the missionary for his 
Cross. None of these serve two masters, nor can the 
possessor of this great school spirit. He is not one who 
has gone from this school to that, but he is the loyal 
student who, beginning, has struggled to the end, 
and won. 

How memories of school and classmates draw men 



and women from far and near back to the old familiar 
scenes. How they stir within them a pride for the 
achievements of the undergraduates, for does not his 
success belong to his class, his school, and, hence the 
alumni? Who will not claim his share of it? When 
has a game been won that the victory did not cause 
every true alumnus from the Atlantic to the Pacific to 
raise his hat in air, and shout for joy, and, shall we say, 
relief? 

It is not, however, in enthusiasm alone that an 
alumnus shows his loyalty. Look at that beautiful 
picture on the wall; search the shelves of the library 
for the rare volumes which. enrich it; read the inscrip- 
tions upon the handsome and stately buildings lining 
the campus — all are the gifts of alumni or classes. 
How they testify in silence, far more eloquent than 
words, to a deep and abiding affection. 

The results of this splendid attribute are, however, 
more than mere enthusiasm and lore, priceless as these 
may be; they are greater than any material gifts, no 
matter how costly. The product they are of a seed 
which fell on good ground, growing and flourishing till 



48 



THE ALLERLEI 



the soil from whence it sprung was transformed. And, 
as the grain is necessary to the community, so is the 
fruit of this seed indispensable to the institution where- 
in it was fostered. Counted among its most valuable 
assets, it is the very foundation of success and progress. 
Year after year this is evinced as a father, a mother, 
brings back a son or daughter to the old school. They 
pass down the familiar walks, memories surging fast 
within, and instruction mingles with recollection: 
"That is the house where I lived." "By that third 
window stood my desk." "In this house we made 
candy, unknown to the Faculty, but don't you do it." 



"This great elm has sprung from the little sapling my 
class planted." 

This, then, is school spirit, in part. We know not 
all of it, nor yet half, but we are blind indeed who can 
not see it between the lines of letters from "old girls." 
We are dense if we do not discern it in the future of our 
own lives when, separated to the four corners of the 
earth, memory's eye will strain back to this dear old 
building, these elms and chestnuts, these walls and 
walks, these duties, failures, and achievements, these 
friends, and this Our School. 

Lucy Aldrich, TO. 




ROOM I 



THE ALLERLEI 



49 



Athletic 

MacDonald 

IjUMBARD 

Best Looking 
Kelsey 
Lane 

Cutest 

Utter 
Bensinger 

Democratic 
Hazelet 
Woodward 

Entertaining 
Hazelet 
Pierce 

Fascinating 
Kelsey 
Wessel 

Graceful 
Dudley 
MacDonald 

Happiest 

MacDonald 

Laurens 

Independent 

DlETZ 

Berman 



Hasell glpftabet 

Jolliest 

Thomas 
Carneal 

Knowing 

Aldrich 
Gallaher 

Lovable 

Snyder 
Utter 

Mannish 
Kelsey 
Kelly 

Neatest 

Harvey G. 
Spargo 

Original 
Shinn 
Lawton 

Popular 

Hazelet 
Snyder 

Quiet 

Meloon 
Nehigian 

Respected 

Woodward 
Snyder 



Stylish 
Lane 
Harvey, M. 

Talented 
Synder 
Flynn 

Unassuming 
Brandow 
De Murguiondo 

Virtuous 
Ordway 
Stryker 

Wittiest 
Shinn 
Dorr 

Xtreme 

Harris, M. 
Bensinger 

Yankee 
Hardy 

Proctor 

Zealous 

SlGGINS 

Ordway 



50 THEALLERLEI 



$tcfearb 2|ou£e 

P the initial of Pickard House dear, 

The abode of the Seniors for aye from this year. 
I is for idleness you cannot find; 

There's plenty to do if you make up your mind. 
C for our class, trusty and true, 

Loyal forever to gold and to blue. 
K for the kindness universally felt, 

You'll know it the minute herein you have dwelt. 
A for ambition, our home doth inspire, 

Come visit Pickard, if this you require: 
R for readiness with which we cheer, 

Glorious Pickard House, Senior House dear. 
D for desire all "Pickardites" cherish, 

To continue her praise, may her name never perish. 

E. P., '10. 




THE ALLERLEI 



51 



aranbon J|ouge 



In future wanderings round the world, 
Visiting places remote, perhaps, 
No more alluring place you'll find 
Than Karandon the Fair, on all the maps. 

This is the home here at Lasell, 

Where twelve congenial comrades dwell. 

Our Principal lives also here 

With his sweet wife and winsome babies dear. 

It stands upon a little hill, 

Which every day with ready will 

We climb, for porch, for walk, for wall, 

By us are loved, yes loved, by one and all. 



Not one who lives in this dear place 

Ever wears a discontented face; 

For she is conscious of the fact, 

That Karandon has nothing to be lacked. 

The thoughts of it will e'er be sweet, 
And the parties, and good things to eat 
We will not forget, nor the cheer 
Of our hostess, making joy appear. 

Days will pass, years will pass, and yet — 
We'll never, no never, we say, forget 
The grand old times and strenuous, too, 
Which we had this year, Karandon, in you. 



R. K., TO. 







52 



THE ALLERLEI 



Cu£f)man J|aU 



Dear Cushman, our Hall of Fame, 

How pleasant the sound of your name — 

It reminds us of nights filled with rarest delights; 

To live here is all the girls' aim. 

The larks that we have over here, 
With none can compare, far or near — 
For think of the girls— as lively as squirrels, 
Who make the halls ring with good cheer. 



Of the corridors now I must speak; 

At their names, tho', I fear you will shriek. 

"Angel Row" you all know, 

But hark! listen! and lo! 

What think you of "Devils' Retreat"? 

There'll be many and many a year 
That we'll think of the times we've had here. 
So come one and all, be you great or small, 
And give us a rousing good cheer. 

A. P. A. 



'12. 




THE ALLERLEI 



53 



Carter J|all 



When first we came to dear Lasell 

From homes so far away, 
We knew not where we were to dwell 

Among the buildings gay. 

And when we found 'twas Carter Hall 
With rooms so bright and cheery, 

We carried banners, pictures — all — 
Until we sank down, weary. 

So Carter Hall became our home, 

And often we did say : 
"To this fair spot we'll e'er be true, 

Forever and a day." 




Oh, there we spent some merry days 

With the girls so full of fun — 
The finest girls in many ways, 

Here's a health to every one! 

And now when scattered far and wide, 

Our happy school days o'er, 
Thoughts of Lasell will never fade — 

We cherish them more and more. 

As out into the world we go, 

Each to a different call, 
Our memories fly back many times 

To our home in Carter Hall. 

H. B. M., '12. 



54 



THE ALLERLEI 



Clark Cottage 



There's a pumpkin-colored cottage with a cheerful, 

homey air, 
Where there dwell a youthful teacher and a host of 

lasses fair, 
And a loving guardian angel with a smile upon her 

face : — 
Let me tell you just a little of these inmates of the place. 

Up underneath the shingles lives a Dutch doll-baby, 

Cress ; 
Also laughing, chief-rough-houses, jolly, ever-hungry 

Bess. 
While across the hall from Cheeryville we find a swarm 

of B's— , 
The Billikin, the Babe, and wee Dot Beacom, if you 

please. 

There's a royal prima donna, it is certain, sure as fate, 

Is the Prince of all the Freshmen who resides in num- 
ber eight; 

And her room-mate, 'tis surprising, little Mistress 
Whittlesey, 

Ever in her dreams still murmurs "Ach, mein Her- 
mann — Germany !" 

Madame President, Miss Ordway, with a tireless energy, 
When she practises piano exercises every key: 
Edith Herrick, Miss New England, is a born aristocrat, 
And as dear as she is lovely — any one will vouch for that. 



Then the tiny, dimpled Party, who possesses ne'er a 

care, 
Contrasts well with tall and stately, conscientious Helen 

Sayre; 
And Emilia, the plump one, waxeth fatter every day. 
But with long and lanky Marion it's quite the other 

way. 

Such the maidens of Clark Cottage, looks and manners, 

style and ways, — 
Each one loves her campus home and mentions it with 

highest praise; 
And a more united family can't be found in all the land 
Than these merry, matchless maidens who compose 

our happy band. 

M. B., Special. 




THE ALLERLEI 



55 



■^atotfjorne Jfyou&t 



The girls who lived in Hawthorn House, beginning of 

the term, 
Had ample opportunity, each clay, for them to learn 
To live with mere necessities, and only said, "That's 

queer!" 
When day by day went flying by and things did not 

appear. 

For it was hard to get along, each day, with nothing 

more 
Than a hand glass, and a "Guide to Life," which hung 

upon the door. 
And it was not convenient, each time they needed light. 
To have to hunt for matches, as they never were in 

sight. 




But when they had electric lights, and furniture ar- 
rived, 

It is expressed too mildly, to say they were surprised. 

They had their own small dining-room, a cozy, cheerful 
place; 

And things began progressing at a very rapid pace. 

Three of the eleven girls, who made the band of "Haw- 
thornites," 

At Christmas time deserted; but their rooms, and all 
their rights 

Were taken by three others, and their friendship and 
good cheer, 

We hope will still continue, all throughout the coming- 
year. 

D. R., '13. 






DRILL 




TOT MCLEAN 

Major 



MILDRED GOOPALL 

Adjutant 



THE ALLERLEI 



57 



Captains! 






Edna MacDonald 

.' Captain Co. B 




Mary Lumbard 
Captain Co. C 




Mary Gallaher 
Captain Co. A 



Reva Berman 
Captain Co. D 



THE ALLERLEI 



59 



athletic* 



AS every one at the present day believes strongly 
in and encourages Athletics, so here at Lasell 
the instructors forward the interest in it, and 
most all the students take part in some one of its 
branches. In the spring and autumn the school work 
is made lighter, enabling us to spend more time on 
outdoor sports, and from the happy, strong, healthy- 
looking faces of our girls, one could tell they are from 
Lasell, as Lasell is well known for its athletics. 

The events that take place are — Canoe Race, Tennis 
Field Day and Drill, the canoe race being without 
doubt the most picturesque. We have the beautiful 
Charles River not six blocks from the school where we 
canoe, beginning as early in spring as possible until 
June, and again in September, when we return from 
our summer vacation, till the latter part of October. 
In the fall, the gymnasium teacher takes parties of 
girls who intend trying for the crew out in the big war 
canoes (so as to get some idea of the work each one 
does). Then in spring the girls wishing to make the 
crew, take a physical examination, and those passing- 
it are put on, there being twenty-seven in all, with a 
few substitutes. There are three war canoes, each 
seating nine persons, with a captain, the steerer, in 



each one. The girls practice afternoons, before break- 
fast and sometimes after dinner in the long spring 
evenings. The race comes off usually the week before 
Commencement and great excitement reigns through- 
out the school on that eventful day. Leaving the 
school early in the morning we paddle down the river 
to the race-course. The students wishing to watch, go 
in single canoes, and others in launches,, each bearing 
the colors of the crew she wishes to win. The course 
is three-quarters of a mile long against current and a 
hard and exciting pull it is, but it is well worth it for 
the winning crew is rewarded with white sweaters on 
which is a large blue L. Each set of nine girls has its 
uniform sailor blouse and white skirt and to a looker-on 
at the finish it is a very pretty sight indeed to see these 
three canoes coming, quite close together usually, the 
members in each keeping time with their stroke. 
About half way down the course, the ones at the win- 
ning place can see the position of the three boats, and 
then as they come on, one falls behind, another gains, 
and so on, changing places, until the end is reached, 
and one boat, perhaps not the one which seemed ahead 
before, comes in first. Every one is shouting and 
calling from one to another, and from the uproar a 



60 



THE ALLERLEI 



stranger passing by might think it some holiday 
celebration. 

The athletic spirit at Lasell prompted at the begin- 
ning of the school year a tennis tournament. There 
were six sets of girls, two in a set, who played. The 
winners of each set then played together, and so on, 
until one girl came out champion. The new girls found 
that Lasell stood for active athletics and the way in 
which they entered into them promises great things for 
the spring. We have three very good tennis courts, 
and these are occupied most of the time. Many do not 
play tennis at all when they first come, but they soon 
get into the spirit and are able to play fairly well at the 
close of school. The fall tournament is a sort of pre- 
paratory work for the large one in spring, for it is then 
that the best players come forth and give us a fine, 
exciting game. Every year there are many splendid 
players. 

During the winter months, besides our regular work 
in gymnasium, we have preparatory work for Field 
Day, which comes off the end week of school. This 
sport has more or less of class spirit in it, because after 
the individual winners are announced, the winnings of 
each class are given out, and naturally each girl wants 
her class to come out ahead so she does her best in 
everything attempted. The different things done are 
— the high jump, vaulting, broad jump, running hop- 



step and a jump, putting the shot, and relay race. 
The latter is done regardless of class and the best run- 
ners in school are selected for it. Not only does this 
class spirit encourage girls to do their best, but also the 
thought of a sweater with class numerals, an L or a 
bar, for it is quite an honor to have one of these. Be- 
fore this year we played basket-ball in the spring only 
and then not much was made of it, but this year we 
have begun the playing of indoor basket-ball and it is 
hoped that by spring we will have fairly good teams, 
if not class, then teams picked from the whole school. 
Last of the Athletics, but certainly not the least, is 
drill. This is one which all the students have to take 
part in, unless excused by the doctor. It is begun in 
the fall and continued once a week till Drill Day in 
June. We are drilled by Lieutenant Ranlet of Boston, 
until he has a chance to select the captains for the 
four companies A, B, C, and D, who take command 
of the company to which each is assigned, with Lieu- 
tenant Ranlet acting as instructor. Ours is the regu- 
lar military drill, having the same officers, major, 
adjutant, captains, lieutenants, sergeants and cor- 
porals. We have uniform suits, made as much as 
possible like the original costume, and wooden guns 
are carried by all privates and officers below the lieu- 
tenants, and those above carry swords. The part of 
the campus on which we drill is divided into company 



THE ALLERLEI 



61 



streets and on Drill Day each of these is decorated with 
its colors, making the yard very attractive. A recep- 
tion is held in the parlors for Lieutenant Ranlet and 
his military friends before drill begins. When the bell 
sounds each company takes its place and all is made 
ready. At different intervals the military band plays, 
and the bugler gives the commands. The companies 
drill separately for about twenty minutes and the 
judges follow closely, noting all errors. After the 
three have drilled, the Manual of Arms competition 
is held. All those wishing to try for this prize form in 



a line and receive a number, to be fastened on their 
waists, enabling the judges to decide which ones are 
competent. The line marches on to the drilling ground 
and receives the commands from some higher officer 
and those failing to come up to the standard are asked 
to drop out, until the winner gains the point. The 
prizes are awarded by one of the judges to the winning 
company and the winner of the Manual of Arms. 
After all this has been seen, to the enjoyment of many 
people, we all retire to the dining room and partake of 
an appetizing dinner, followed by speeches. 





mtt ciub 



THE ALLERLEI 



63 



Hist of #ler Club 



Mildred Snyder 
Florence Nelson 
Julia Ter Kuile 
Miss Goodrich 
Amie Wessel . 
Josephine Woodward 
Julia Ter Kiule . 



. President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Director 

Accompanist 

. Business Manager 

Leader 



First Sopranos 
Julia Ter Kiule 

Miriam Flynn 

Sarah Shuttleworth 

Marion Holstead 

Clara Prince 

Second Sopranos 
Florence Nelson 

Helen Mayer 

Edith Waller 

Marion Shinn 

Marion Pierce 



First Altos 
Josephine Woodward 
Louise Porter 

Myrilla Annis 

Marion Hale 

Helen Shepherd 

Second Altos 
Florence Thompson 
Julia Hamilton 

Elsie Bensinger 

Lucy Aldrich 

Mildred Snyder 



64 



THE ALLERLEI 




£a*ell #lee Club 



THE Lasell Glee Club occupies an important posi- 
tion in the musical life of the school. Since its 
organization in 1901 by Miss Bates, this society 
has been successful in possessing members who not only 
have excellent voices, but who are interested enough to 
spend their time and best efforts in rendering the finest 
music for the pleasure and benefit of the Seminary. 



The club is now under the leadership of Miss Good- 
rich, one of the vocal teachers. Under her wise direc- 
tion a schedule of study for the year is arranged and the 
course is followed with much interest during the weekly 
practice. The result of this systematic training is 
noted first during the year at the Christmas vespers, 
which, according to custom, is led by the club girls. 



THE ALLERLEI 



65 



Dressed in white, they march in, singing Leighten's 
joyous processional, "Herald Angels," and throughout 
the evening render a program of such beautiful Christ- 
mas music that this of all the other services is loved 
best by the school. Among the numbers given this 
year were Handel's "Holy Art Thou" and "The Guest 
of the Three Kings" by Noble. 

The Glee Club Spring Concert is always anticipated 
as being a most delightful social occasion as well 
as the chief concert of the year. For at that time 
the campus with its fresh verdure is so beautiful that 



the girls take this opportunity to invite many of their 
friends to see Lasell at its best. The guests are 
received in the parlors by a reception committee 
and afterwards a supper is served them in the 
dining room. 

The concert itself is given in the gymnasium and the 
program consists of miscellaneous music — a variety 
always being enjoyable for every one. As yet we do 
not know exactly what music will be given, but we feel 
certain that the selections will be excellent and will 
also be finely rendered. 



■f^ i& 


H9*<3 ■ST^fl By^ Bt^ 1^^ 

.tjMBW i^MW - 5 1 fl 


r i? 


"« ;£!. t a ,,j> ■ / BHHHSHHRpHlH&i . ■ 



ramattc Club 



THE ALLERLEI 



67 



Utat of Bramattc Club 



Reva Berman . 
Edna MacDonald 
Gladys Stults 
Mary Gallaher 
Helen SAyre . 
Mary Lumbard ■ 
Ruth Kelsey . 



... . President 

Vice-President 

. Secretary and Treasurer 

Stage Manager 

Assistant Stage Manager 

Costumer 

. Business Manager 



Vera Bradley Elsie Fies Louise Miller 

Elizabeth Brandow Elsie Gulick Edith Palmer 

Elizabeth Burke Marguerite Harris Louise Porter 

Ruth Burkett Marion Harvey Jeanette Ritter 

Nell Carneal Martha Hazelet Josephine Siggins 

Julia De Witt Helen Hood Ethel St. Clair 

Clara De Wolf Gladys Lawton Fan Thomas 

Nina Dietz Elizabeth Linn Josephine Woodward 

Alma Dumn Helen Mayer Amie Wessel 



68 



THE ALLERLEI 




Haseli ©ramattc Club 



THE work of the Lasell Dramatic Club is designed 
to develop its members physically, as well as 
mentally and artistically, through the study and 
interpretation of the best dramas which it is possible for 
them to present. Especial attention is paid to grace- 
ful and correct carriage and movement — the purpose 
being to obtain a natural rather than a studied bodily 



poise and manner. Since the best expression of a lit- 
erary work is the direct result of having grasped and 
felt the thought of the writer, it can not be secured 
merely by imitating tones of voice and applying ges- 
tures suitable to the outward interpretation of lines. 
This better method the club aims to apply to the best 
of its ability in all of its study; and the benefit obtained 



THE ALLERLEI 



69 



from it, if applied to everyday life, is extremely helpful 
in securing an ease of manner which is always desirable 
and not always obtained; in developing the speaking 
voice; and in cultivating clearness of thought and a 
better appreciation of good literature. 

Mrs. Martin, the teacher of Expression in the school, 
acts as the adviser of the club in selecting the plays 
best suited for its presentation, and in choosing and 
coaching the characters for the casts. 

The club usually superintends some entertainment on 



the evening of Washington's Birthday, and, during the 
latter part of the February term it gives a play, sup- 
posed to represent its best work. Last year at that 
time "King Rene's Daughter" was presented, and in 
December this year, two attractive short comedies, 
"The Kleptomaniac" and "The Nettle" were success- 
fully played before the school. At present certain of 
the members are busy preparing "The Rivals," which 
they expect to produce during the early part of 
March. 



&lma Jfflater 

(Tune— "Amici"— Cornell Song) 



Bound firm by a bond unbroken, 



Bright school days are quickly past, 



Love for old Lasell, 
Take we now a pledge outspoken 
E'er to guard her well. 

Chorus 
Alma Mater, Fidelitas, 

Pledge, girls, for loyalty; 
Sing it now before we part, 

We'll ever faithful be. 



Enjoy them while we may; 
Memory still shall them outlast, 
When we are far away. 



E. B. 




i£>tgma ^>tgma i^ouetp 



THE ALLER'LEI 



71 



g>igma ^>tgma g>octetj> 



Eleanor Laurens 

Marjorie Watkins 
Hannah Proctor 
Helen Shepherd 
Gladys Lawton 

Ethel St. Clair 
Alma Dumn 



Hazel Drew 

Hazel Bower 

Catherine Brooks 

Priscilla Schweppe 
Mildred Snyder 
Helen Ferry 

Doris Powers 



72 



THE ALLERLEI 



iiugma g>igma g>octetj> 



ALL of the art students at Lasell are entitled to 
membership in the Sigma Sigma Society, 
which, founded by Miss Mulliken, the Art 
teacher, is primarily an organization to promote "jolly 
good fellowship" among the studio girls. As this is a 
secret society, very little can be found out concerning it, 
except that, as we all know, in the early part of the fall 
term mysterious notes are received by all members-to- 
be among the new girls, bidding them on a certain 
evening to come in simple attire and humble in spirit, 
to the studio. We only know that they have an initia- 
tion and afterwards a spread, designed to act as oil on 
troubled waters. But one who has noted the appear- 
ance of returning victims can not help being impressed 



with the idea that a society whose membership is so 
much sought for that applicants will cheerfully undergo 
all sorts of trying circumstances to win it, must indeed 
be worth while. 

The work of this society at least is worth while, for 
the members are always willing and glad to render 
their services to the school paper or the year book; and 
whenever a play or other entertainment is to be given, 
all interesting particulars concerning it are furnished by 
posters cleverly designed and painted by these same girls. 

It is always interesting to examine the work of the 
club in the drawings, paintings, and arts-and-crafts 
work, which are exhibited in the studio during Com- 
mencement week. 




THE ALLERLEI 



73 



jHtg£tonarp i£>octetp 

THE Lasell Missionary Society has a membership 
of practically all of the students, each of whom 
pledges a weekly due of five cents or more. This 
sum, together with that raised at our annual lawn fes- 
tival, is then divided among several domestic and foreign 
missionary enterprises in which Lasell is interested. 
Recently word was received from India, saying that 
Caroline Lasell, the orphan, whom we have helped, to 
support in one of the missions there, has lately married 
and so no longer needs our assistance; but another 
bright little girl has been chosen to have our name and 
to be educated with our help. The society also aids in 
the maintenance of the Lasell Mission School in India, 
the work of Mrs. Emma Barnum Briggs, in Luilkey, 
and has an interest in the International Institute for 
Girls in Spain. A part of our funds assists the work of 
the deaconesses and the Frances E. Willard Settlement 
work, in Boston during the holiday time. We are glad, 
also, to pledge some help to the Floating Hospital and 
other home charities. 



Christian Cnbeatoor ikictetp 

THE Lasell Christian Endeavor Society was organ- 
ized in 1889 by Dr. Francis E. Clark, the father 
of this world-wide movement'; and since then 
its influence for good over the school has steadily in- 
creased. The weekly meetings are well attended and 
especial pains are taken to make them interesting and 
helpful to the students. 




74. THEALLERLIE 



lagell iWorntng feong 

(Tune— "My Wife's Gone to the Country") 

Oh, "We are well and happy!" To be "refined and buoyant," 

Hooray! hooray! And strong, alert and true — 

For Mrs. Martin's with us — "Awake in mind and body," 

She's here most every day. And straight of shoulder, too. 

Oh, "we are tall and handsome"— And if we're truly all this, 

That's what the people say. And never make a fuss 

And "something good has surely come," "The good we give out to the world 

To make us bright and gay. Will e'er come back to us." 

"Build thee more stately mansions, 

My soul, my soul" — 
"Now say it with some feeling, girls; 

Don't stand there like a pole." 
"Heads high! and lift your chests up, 

On this bright sunny day; 
And say with voices 'sweet and low,' 

Away cares — away." 

A. P. A. '12 



THE ALLERLEI 



75 



Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 

23. School opened. 

Lecture by Dr. Vincent on "Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne." 
25. Boat ride for all the girls on the Charles River. 
A frolic in the gymnasium to make the old and 
new girls better acquainted. 

29. Old girls serenaded the new. 

30. Lecture by Professor Brooks on "Alaska." 

OCTOBER 

1. A party went to Boston to hear Dr. Cook lecture 

on "The North Pole." 

2. Old girls dance to the new. 

7. Dr. Vincent gave an excellent lecture on 

"Emerson the Man." 
16. .Juniors had a fudge party in the Practice Kitchen. 
18. Concord and Lexington trip. 

Seniors came to dinner capped and gowned. 
21. Reading by Mr. Van Kirk on "Browning." 
28. Lecture by Dr. Vincent on "Lowell." 
30. Hallowe'en party in the gymnasium. 



1. 
4. 

F.5- 
11. 
12. 
18. 
19. 

24. 



11. 

12. 
14. 
15. 



NOVEMBER 

Party went to Salem. 

Lecture by Jacob Riis, honorary member of 

Senior Class. 
French reception. 
Recital by Mr. Alvah Salmon. 
German play and reception. 

Lecture by Dr. Vincent on. "Oliver W. Holmes." 
Girls went in to the Harvard-Yale Glee Club 

Concert. 

Thanksgiving vacation. 

DECEMBER 

French play and reception. 

Two very interesting plays by the Dramatic Club: 

"The Nettle" and "The Kleptomaniac." 
Glee Club Vespers. 
Students' Recital. 
Off for "Home, Sweet Home." 



76 



THE ALLERLEI 



JANUARY 

6. School opens again. 
10. First skating on the Charles River. 
13. Most interesting lecture by "our" Miss Mulliken 

on "Whistler." 
17. Juniors mysteriously disappeared after dinner. 
20. Lecture by Dr. Powers on "Michael Angelo." 
22. The Innes Comet was visible and all the girls were 

on the roof to enjoy it. 
27. Mr. Bailey gave an excellent lecture. 
29. , The Senior Banquet to the Juniors at Woodland 

Park Hotel. 

FEBRUARY 

3. Lecture by Mrs. Coolidge on "English Cathe- 
drals." " 

5. Country wedding in the gym, which every one 
enjoyed. 

9. Lecture by Professor Brooks on "The Evening 
and Morning Stars." 



10. Lecture by Professor Brooks on "Comets and 
Meteors." 

22. Washington's Birthday festivities. 

24. Wilhelm Heinrich charmed the girls by his song- 
recital. Reception afterward. 

26. Juniors went to Wellesley Inn and — well, that's 

enough. 

27. Day of Prayer. 

Inspiring messages from Dr. J. A. Richards and 
Miss Fletcher. 

r 

MARCH 

3. Reception. The musical program was enjoyed by 
all. 

9. Orphean Concert. 

10. Another interesting lecture by Mr. Bailey. 
12. Juniors' party to the Seniors. 
22. A very fine Spring Concert. 



THE ALLERLEI 



77 



Jfabortte expression* of tfje Jfacultp 



Miss Witherbee: "Miss X. Y. Z., you may Sit." 
"Puzzle: find the grandfather?" 

Miss Irwin: "That is to say — as it were." 

Miss Ntjtt: "Why — er — have you permission?" 

Fraulein: "Also! Naturlieh." 

Miss Warner: "Girls, have you registered?" 

Miss Potter: "What is it, girlie?" 

Miss Rand: "Heavens, woman! Now, for instance 
suppose " 

Mademoiselle: "You talk French like a Spanish 
cow!" 



Miss Packard: "Please see me at your earliest 

convenience." 

Miss Dolly: " " (A smile, accompanied 

by a faint giggle.) 

Mrs. Loomis: "This is no conversation class!" 
Dr. Winslow: "It is with great pleasure that I 

introduce " 

Mrs. Martin: "You dear babies!" 

Lieutenant Ranlett: "MY COMPANY " 

Mr. Winslow: "It is so because" (full pause). 
Miss Dillingham: "Girls, I wish you would come 

more quietly through the gym." 





r 'cj 



V < 



Mentor Bcsttnp 



THE ALLERLEI 



79 




<§rtnb$ 



Miss Mulliken (in the 8.50 History of Art Class) : 
Have we had any other reclining figure of a woman? 
Pupil: Hermes Reposing. 

Miss Witherbee (coming upon a group of girls who 
are searching for Miss Nutt) : Oh ! you're going nut- 
ting? • 



Hazel Bower has so profited by Miss Potter's lec- 
tures on "Manners" that she knocks at her own door 
before going in. 

First Girl (giving summary of the French play) : 
And so neither of them were married after all. 
Second Girl: I see, it was a tragedy then. 



80 



THE ALLERLEI 



Fraulein Heinrich (translating) : He sat with his 
elbow on his chin. 

E. Laurens (in History of Art) : Miss Mulliken, 
let us pose for the boy and the goose ; let me be the boy 
and Reva the goose. 

Miss Mulliken: Oh! I'm afraid that would be 
too realistic. 

Jo Siggins and Jo Woodward (talking about New 
Mexico : 

Jo Siggins: Say, Jo, are there any Apache Indians 
still in New Mexico? 

Jo Woodward: Well, yes, on the reservoirs you 
know. 

Miss Rand (in XIX Century History) : If a man 
has $500 on which he is bringing up his wife 

Winifred Whittlesley (discussing Le Juif Poli- 
nais) : Well, M. Mathis woke up in the morning all 
dead. 

E. Laurens (to electrician) : Now when you fix the 
light don't put in any kind of a red cord, put in a nice 
green one. 

Electrician (politely) : Any particular shade, 
ma'am? 



Miss Witherbee: Where is your excuse, Miss 
McLean? 

Tot McLean: Up in Miss Nutt's room. 

Miss Witherbee: That's a good place for it, it 
will keep well there. 

Miss Farmer (describing the Pantheon) : The 
dome was sort of a circular circle. 

Miss Mulliken: Miss Farmer, will you give an 
example of an old Roman bath? 

Miss Farmer: Cocoa Cola. (Perhaps she meant 
Cara Calla(?)). 

Alma Dumn: Why, girls, I was so frightened that I 
was almost killed to death! 

Altho they use sulphur to kill bugs on trees (as Miss 
Shinn says), Mr. Winslow does not know whether they 
use it in the dog pound or not. 

Mary Starr Utter (just returning from the water 
tank) : My dear, there is an awful crowd out there 
waiting for drinks. 

Mary Lumbard (studying Bible) : Why, Paul was 
a tent maker. I didn't know that. 

Miss Blass (overhearing) : We'll know who to go 
to for a camping outfit, won't we? 



THE ALLERLEI 



81 



Marguerite Murdoch: My crush is so uncon- 
scientious. 

Said at dinner at Miss Nutt's table to Miss Nutt: 
Oh! I dislike all kinds of Nutts. 

Why does Grace Alexander wear black? Is she in 
mourning or does she think it is becoming, or ? 

President Ordway sat forcibly on Vice-President 
Kelly in Wellesley Square. 

Senior definition of versatile: The ability to write 
verses. 

Why is a Lasell girl's laundry like a box of Huyler's? 
Because every piece bears a name. 

Miss Rand (decidedly): Yes, the Philadelphia 
strike is by far the most interesting topic of domestic 
news at present and engrosses most of our attention. 

Fraulein Heinrich (Feb. 22) : Have Fraulein 
Kelsey and Nelson a strike on each other? 

M. H. : Julia, do you know what calomel is? 
Julia Crafts: It is a certain amount of heat. 
(Did she mean calorie?) 



Edna had a lovely switch 

The color of her hair. 
And every place that Edna went, 
The switch was also there. 

One day she wore it to the Gym. 
She'll never do so more. 
She shook her head, some pins slipped out, 
The switch fell on the floor. 

Miss Packard (In Bible Class) : The parable of 
the lemon (leaven) is symbolical of womanhood. 

Miss Marsh (having risen from bed, at Mlle.'s 
command, to come to study hall) : Why am I here? 

Mlle. : That's your look-out. 

Marsh : But I was in bed with a cold. 

Mlle. : Does Miss Nutt know about the cold? 

Marsh : Yes. 

Mlle. : Then it's not my look-out. 

Marsh: But who sent me? 

Mlle. (adding insult to injury): That's not my 
business. Who sent you last time? 

Marsh (haughtily) : This is my first experience. 

Time dragged but finally the nine o'clock bell rang 
and Caroline departed. 



82 



THE ALLERLEI 



It was nearly time for the "lights out" bell when a 
step was heard upon the stair, and in came Miss 
Hotchkiss. With a pitying smile, she handed the 
abused one a note which speaks for itself. "My Dear 
Miss Marsh : Will you forgive me for reading your name 
for the month of March, as I took the c for an s, etc." 

The list for Study Hall had been dated March 1, 
which Mile, took for Marsh. 

And it was not even March 1, it was February 28. 

Mlle. (speaking of her walking trip) : At the end 



of a long day's tramp I was so dirty; I was gloriously 
dirty. 

Elsie B.: Well, how do you expect me to know 
how to pronounce viki verka (vice versa)? I don't take 
French. 

Mrs. Martin (calling roll in Expression Class): 
Miss Lane. (No answer.) 

Mrs. Martin: Miss Lane! 

Lil Lane (wildly cramming her stanza of the Pied 
Piper) : Rats! 





TlNIS 



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AD V E R T I S EM EN TS 







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HAWTHORNE HOUSE 



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AUBURNDALE 
MASSACHUSETTS 



OUR 60TH YEAR BEGINS 
SEPTEMBER 22, 1910 



<][ We give thorough training in the 
theory and practice of home-making 
in all its departments 

APPLY FOR CATALOGUE, TO 

G. M. WINSLOW, Principal 



ADV ER T I S EM ENTS 



in 



GEORGE W. HARVEY, President and Treasurer 
Member of Master Builders' Association 



GEORGE W. HARVEY CO. 



Building . . 
Contractors 

201 DEVONSHIRE ST. 60 ARCH ST. 

Rooms 516-518 

BOSTON SAFE DEPOSIT AND TRUST COMPANY BUILDING 

Telephone Main 174--4870 

BOSTON 



STORAGE 



SUPPLIES 



REPAIRING 



Arbor way Garage 





209 SOUTH 


STREET 




JAMAICA 


PLAIN 


TELEPHONE 




GEORGE W. HARVEY 


JAMAICA 57 




Treasurer 



it ADVERTISEMENTS 



Poole Printing Co. 

Makers of Good Printing 
221 HIGH ST. - - BOSTON, MASS. 



May everyone be at the head 
of the class in 1911 

Houghton & Dutton Co. 



ADV ER T I S EM EN TS 




360-362 Boylston Street 
(Between Arlington and Berkeley) 

Japanese Kimonos, in Cotton Crepe, Habutai Silk, 
Wadded Silk, Crepe, Silk and Satin Brocade with Art 
Embroidery. 

Opera and Evening Japanese and Chinese Em- 
broidered Coats. 

Silk, Crepe and Chiffon Scarfs and Throws. 

Waist and Robe Patterns, Hand-Embroidered, 
Unmade. 

Bags and Purses. Umbrellas. 

Fans of Paper, Gauze and Silk, Plain and Dec- 
orated. 

Oriental Jewelry. Vantine's Jewel Craft is Orig- 
inal and Unique. 

Genuine Ivory, both Plain and Carved. 

Artistic Lamps and Shades. Vantine's Designs. 

Japanese and Chinese Porcelains, Enamels, 
Bronzes, Brass and Silverware. 

Carved Wood Furniture, Fire and Folding Screens. 

Vantine's Perfumes, Condiments and Teas, World 
Famous. 

Have you patronized our Tea Room? 

A. A. VANTINE & COMPANY 

Japan Offices : 
YOKOHAMA KOBE NAGOYA 



HARRIS E. JOHONNOT 

Electrician 

Incandescent Lighting and Power 
Wiring, Bells, Annunciators, Burg- 
lar Alarms, Gas Lighting Apparatus, 
Speaking Tubes and Telephone 
Systems 

WELSBACH SUPPLIES 



A specialty will be made of all kinds of 

Electrical Repair Work 

And of applying Electrical Apparatus in finished houses 
with as little inconvenience to the occupants as possible. 



Office, 136 Pearl St. Order Office, 392 Centre St. 
NEWTON, MASS. 



Telephone, New. No. 758-2 



VI 



ADVER T I S EM EN TS 




Illustration of 25 
Self-Oiling Engine 
to Generator. 



H.P. Horizontal Automatic 
Built for Direct Connection 



TROY ENGINES gjjgfggj 

Compact and rugged design. Finest materials and work- 
manship. Self -oiling or gravity lubrication. Automatic 
or throttling governors. Service by belt or direct 
connection. 

Sizes : 

Vertical 2 to ioo h.p. Horizontal 15 to 100 h.p. ,Troy 
engines are built to give satisfactory results under severe 
conditions. 

Troy Engine & Machine Co. 

TROY, PENN. 



<B 



ranes 




is universally conceded to be the correct medium of communi- 
cation between discriminating correspondents. You will like 
its clear, uniform texture, its delicate fabric finish, and its de- 
lightful writing surface. 

Crane's Linen Lawn may be procured of your stationer, not 
only in white, but in all the tints now in vogue. The water 
mark " Crane's" in each sheet will be your assurance that you 
are getting what you ask for. 

EATON CRANE & PIKE CO., Pittsfield, Mass. 



Hotel Touraine 
Parker House 
Young's Hotel 



J. R. WHIPPLE COMPANY 



BOSTON 



ADV ER T I SEM ENTS 



vn 



WILLIAM O. HARRIS 
Carpenter and Builder 



All kinds of Jobbing promptly attended 
to. Hardwood Floors a specialty. Roof- 
ing of all kinds and Screens repaired 
and made :::::: 

Shop and Residence 

17 Melrose Avenue AUBURNDALE, MASS. 

Telephone Connection 



Make The Most of 
Your Opportunities 

You will find a most unique one 
at 

...THE WELLESLEY INN... 

Come with your friends and your families 
at all seasons. 

TABLE D'HOTE MEALS AFTERNOON TEA SPECIAL PARTIES 




A. F. WALLUSKY 



It's Snappy for the Chafing Dish 

Gorton' s Codfish Creamed 



Crackers and Bread, Plain or Toasted 



Vtll 



AD V ER T I SEM ENTS 



..WEAR 



HUTMACHER'S SHOES 



Walk- Over, Queen Quality 
and Evangeline 



WALTHAM'S LEADING SHOE DEALER 



181 Moody Street 



J 




WHITE MOUNTAINS 


Smith Patterson Co. 

Diamond Merchants 




The Bellevue and Annex 


3fetoeler£ antr |§>ilber£mitf)£ 

SUPERB STOCK 
COURTEOUS ATTENTION 

COMPARISON OF 
PRICES INVITED 


llNlhKVALfc., IN. H. 


The Bellevue, first class in all its appointments, is 
open for summer and winter guests. Summer season from 
June 1st to November 1st. 

Intervale is an ideal winter resort, where nearly all 


52 Summer Street - - Boston 

Wholesale and Retail 


bogganing, Snowshoeing, Skiing, etc. 

For further information address the proprietors, 






J. A. BARNES' SONS 



ADVER T I S EM EN TS 



IX 



A WORD TO WOMEN 

WHO APPRECIATE PERFECT 
FITTING SHOES 

You will find in Regal Shoes all the grace- 
ful, handsome shapeliness that identifies the 
finest custom boots in Paris or New York. 

The quarter size fitting of Regal Shoes is 
as comfortable as any made-to-order shoes can 
afford, and the styles we are showing for 
Easter are precisely the same as you'll find in 
any Regal Shop in the country. 

$3.50 and $4.00 

WALTHAM AGENCY FOR REGAL SHOES 

P. P. ADAMS 

Big Dry Goods Department Store 
133-139 MOODY STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 



DR. EUGENE U. UFFORD 

Senttgt 

76 CENTRAL STREET 

Corner of Maple Street 

Office Hours: Monday, Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoons, 2 to 5.30 

Telephone, Newton West 439-2 



White, Son Company 

(Incorporated) 

Importers and Manufacturers 
of 

Poofetrinfterg' jflatertate 
anb Jftne Heathers! 



530 TO 540 ATLANTIC AVENUE 
BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



Cable Address: " WHITESON, BOSTON' 



Brass Craft 

LEATHER AND STENCIL WORK 

Complete Stock of Materials, Tools 
and Patterns 

New Designs Stamped on Brass, German 
Silver and Copper, ready to work 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

J. B. Hunter & Co. 

HARDWARE 

60 Summer St. Boston, Mass. 



Telephone, Dearborn 345 

OSCAR F. MAYER & BRO. 

Jlcef anb $orfe packer* 



SEDGWICK STREET AND BEETHOVEN PLACE 
CHICAGO 



ADV ER T I SEM ENTS 



WOODLAND PARK HOTEL 



Auburndale 

Massachutetts 



HARRY T. MILLER 



Manager 



THE ABELL STUDIO 



and 

GIFT SHOP 



Portraits, Art Goods 
Framed Pictures, Etc. 
in Great Variety . . 



G. L. ABELL 



WELLESLEY 



MASS. 



MacArthur & McBride 

Makers of 

College 
Banners 

TROY and ALBANY 



Chocolates bonbons 

uce Cream Sodas 

College Sees 

146 Uremont St. 

4/4 fioyiston St. 

139 Summer St. 
Boston 



WILLIAM CAPSTICK 
Florist 

Seasonable Flowers for All 
Occasions. Grower of Car- 
nations, Violets, Etc. 

Hawthorne and Aspen Avenues 

Auburndale, Mass. 



WHITE MOUNTAIN 

Fall and Winter 

TOURS 

ARRANGED ESPECIALLY 
FOR THE 

LASELL STUDENTS 



PERSONALLY ESCORTED 
BY 

SETH C. BASSETT, Mgr. 

BASSETTS SELECT TOURS 

Haverhill : : Massachusetts 



AD V ER T I S EM ENTS 



XI 



Established 1867 

WE have served Wellesley College and Dana 
Hall since their foundation with satisfac- 
tion. Why can't we serve you? Flowers 
are made more attractive by their arrangement. 
Ours is the best. Cut flowers: Lilies of the Val- 
ley, Carnations. Roses, Violets, etc. Palms and 
Bay Trees to let for all occasions. Orders delivered 
at Wellesley College and Dana Hall and if a reason- 
able amount delivered at Lasell Seminary, Rock- 
ridge Hall and Walnut Hill School. 

TAILBY 

The Wellesley Florist 

Store, 555 Washington St., Tel. 44-2 

Conservatories, Linden St., Tel. 44-1 
WELLESLEY, MASS. 



Dainty Lunches 



. . AT . . 



McDONALD-WEBER CO. 

156 TREMONT ST. 



Our Catering Service assures you the best possible 



Your Mail Order for Iced Frappe, Birthday Cakes and Confections 
will receive our best attention 



Xll 



ADV ER T I SEM ENTS 




R 



ain 






S*ss ■■' 



Coats 



#Si Women's 
| Swagger 
Coats 

Pure Rubber 

Tan, Black and Gray 

MANNISH 
EXTREME 

CLASSY 

Newest Knockabout 
Storm Rig 

Gotten Up Expressly 

For College and 

School Girls 



C. W. DAVIS 

WELLESLEY .- MASS. 




Compliments! of 

3So*ton Jf manual jgetos